Kathe's Blog

Just when you thought that free college credits and efficient high school planning was as good as it gets, along comes a bombshell bonus!  Several states, including Texas, Georgia, and Arkansas have announced that they have lifted previous restrictions on Dual Enrollment (DE), including age and grade.  That means that students can now start DE in 9th grade. They are no longer limited to just 2 courses. They may take non-core classes such as Photography, Bowling & Nutrition. And best of all, they can .  .  . 


Kids in high school are under a lot of pressure these days. There’s more competition to get into college. And more to juggle on a daily basis, including homework, extracurricular activities and a social life. All while trying to get good grades! This pressure can be tough for any teen. And it’s even harder on kids with learning and attention issues. Stress can lead to behavioral changes, rebellion, loss of motivation, learning problems, low tests scores, and all sorts of things that will interfere with your high school to college plan. Here are some of the major . . . 


If you have a learning difference, chances are that getting off topic is a well developed habit by this point in your life.  No matter what your diagnosis; ADHD, Autism, Aspergers, Attention Deficit, Dyslexia, or Processing Disordered, time management is a common complaint.  If Mom wasn't constantly looking over your shoulder and reminding you to "keep going", its a pretty safe bet that nothing would get done.  Along with inattentiveness and poor handwriting, lack of self time management is one of the hallmarks of .  .  .  


If you are in an AP class, you should already be signed up to take the May AP test for that subject.  If not, then getting signed up should be a priority right now.  Remember an AP class without the associated test is negated in the College Package.  Of course, you don't have to take an AP class to get the GPA and Honors associated with Advanced Placement testing.  The best way to benefit from AP is.  .  .  


If you have a gift, you will want to build a portfolio.  If you are applying to colleges and have an artistic gift such as drawing, painting, photography, music, dance, etc. then you should submit a portfolio with your application.  If you are using CommonApp.org then you will find a place specifically to upload your portfolio. Use it.  If you are using another application site, there will usually be a place where you are allowed to "share any other information that you think is useful to the application process".  This is a great place to upload a resume, explanatory essay, or portfolio.  In order to make a portfolio, there are a few things you will need to know about . . .


Every week I receive at least one email asking me about scholarships for women who plan to pursue a degree in Engineering.  Not surprisingly, engineering as a major is a field that is very disproportionately made up of employees, managers, teachers, and mentors of the male persuasion.  How is a women supposed to get her foot in the door?  Well, the fact is that many colleges and business have partnered to try to address this glaring discrepancy.  Colleges are doing their share by offering my openings for female applicants to their engineering programs.  This includes everything from computers and biomedicine to mechanics, petroleum, and electrical engineering programs.  But getting into an engineering program is not enough.  It needs to be affordable. This is where industry has stepped in.  There are now a wide range of good scholarships available for female students who plan to major in some area of engineering . . .


Getting into college is more competitive than ever. Schools are receiving more applications, which means their acceptance rates are getting lower. Your high school grades and performance on the SAT and/or ACT are often important factors for college admissions officers, but they won't make you stand out from a crowd of other good students. To truly impress admissions officers . . .


What do your CLEP scores mean? Last month you learned that you can take a single test called CLEP and get college credit.  This is a good thing.  You also learned that not all colleges will accept all CLEPs so if you are not careful you could do a lot of work for nothing.  This would be a bad thing.  This month is about CLEP scores.  What they mean, what you need, and how to do better.  CLEP is out of 80.  Meaning, a top CLEP score is an 80.  The lowest score you can get is a 20. If you do the math, that means that the halfway mark is a score of 50.  Which is exactly what many school require in order to give you credit for a subject;-- a 50 on a CLEP.  More selective colleges will usually require a 60.  This means that somewhere between 50-70 percentile on a CLEP test will get you 3-8 college credits in a single subject.   That is worth going after, but what if you happen to fail a CLEP test?. . .


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